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  Indian J Med Microbiol
 

Figure 1: Comparing Primary Stability in Anterior & Posterior Maxilla. Undecalcified slides of an 85-year old unembalmed fresh human male cadaver who received exploratory dental implants within 48 hours of death. (Left) The dental implant in the anterior maxilla was primarily stable and shows intimate contact with the cortical bone. (Right) The dental implant in the posterior maxilla was initially unstable; the area shows thin cortical bone and sparse trabecular bone. The gap between the surrounding bone and the implant might have been created as a result of fracture of low-quality bone during surgical drilling and self-threading procedures

Figure 1: Comparing Primary Stability in Anterior & Posterior Maxilla. Undecalcified slides of an 85-year old unembalmed fresh human male cadaver who received exploratory dental implants within 48 hours of death. (Left) The dental implant in the anterior maxilla was primarily stable and shows intimate contact with the cortical bone. (Right) The dental implant in the posterior maxilla was initially unstable; the area shows thin cortical bone and sparse trabecular bone. The gap between the surrounding bone and the implant might have been created as a result of fracture of low-quality bone during surgical drilling and self-threading procedures